Edmund Bridges

#786, (1612 - 13 January 1684/85)
Relationship6th great-grandfather of Nelle Belle Bridges

Family 1

Alice Millington
Children 1.Edmund Bridges Jr+23 (1637 - 1682)
 2.Hachaliah Bridges29 (c 1639 - 1671/72)

Family 2

Elizabeth Manwaring b. bt 1618 - 1620, d. 1664
Children 1.John Bridges+30 (bt 1639 - 1644 - 1704)
 2.Mehitable Bridges12,23 (1641 - b 1685)
 3.Faith Bridges+31 (c 1645 - )
 4.Obidiah Bridges+32 (1646 - 1677)
 5.Bethia Bridges+33 (c 1649 - )
 6. Josiah Bridges+ (1650 - 1715)

Family 3

Mary Langdon b. c 1625, d. 1691
Child 1.Mary Bridges+34 (1667 - )
Birth*1612He was born in 1612 at EnglandG.1,2,3 
4 June 1635He was found on a passenger list on 4 June 1635 at Bristol, England; see also pdf "Crossing the Atlantic 1635", an account of the ship Angel Gabriel which sailed with the James.4 
July 1635He migrated to Lynn, Massachusetts, from England, gave age as 23 in July 1635.5 
August 1635He was shoemaker, blacksmith in August 1635.5,6 
Marriage*1637He married Alice Millington in 1637 at Essex Co., MassachusettsG; his 1st, but disputed by GM. Parents of Mehitable are given as Edmund and Alice, so if GM is correct, this father is a different Edmund.7,8,9 
7 September 1639He was admitted as a Freeman on 7 September 1639 at Lynn, Massachusetts.10 
1641He and Alice Millington removed in 1641 Rowley.11,10 
Marriage*say 1643He married Elizabeth Manwaring say 1643; his 2nd; AITP has 17 Sep 1639, but Mehitable was b. 1641, dau. of Alice.12,13,14 
circa 1644He and Elizabeth Manwaring removed to Ipswich, Massachusetts Colony, circa 1644 (possibly with Elizabeth.)15 
1648Was a subscriber to the Major Denison fund in 1648 at Ipswich, Essex Co., MassachusettsG.16 
Marriage*6 April 1665He married Mary Langdon, daughter of Roger Langdon and Joan _____, on 6 April 1665 at Essex Co., MassachusettsG; his 3rd.17,18 
9 July 1673He and Edmund Bridges Jr were cited for judgment satisfaction in Court on 9 July 1673 at Salem Quarterly Court, Essex Co., MassachusettsG.19 
12 April 1682"a blacksmith, made a one year mortgage with Mrs. Eliza[beth] Turner of Salem, widow, for his 'dwelling house & shop & wharf, with sixty poles of ground with it' [ER 6:49]" on 12 April 1682 at Salem, Essex Co., MassachusettsG.20 
6 January 1684/85He left a will on 6 January 1684/85 at Essex Co., MassachusettsG.21,22 
Death*13 January 1684/85He died on 13 January 1684/85 at Essex Co., MassachusettsG.23,24 
Inventory16 January 1684/85His estate was inventoried by Edmund Bridges on 16 January 1684/85 at Essex Co., MassachusettsG.25 
Probate*30 March 1685His estate was probated on 30 March 1685 at Essex Co., MassachusettsG.21 
In The Great Migration Begins: "He married (1) By about 1636 Elizabeth . She died at Ipswich 31 December 1664. (Some secondary sources, including Savage, propose an earlier wife Alice, but no supporting evidence for this has been found, so we assume here two wives only for Edmund Bridges.) (2) Ipswich 6 April 1665 Mary (Langton) Littlehale, widow of Richard [EQC 6:118], born about 1625 (deposed 24 November 1685 'aged sixty years' [EQC 9:545]); she died at Ipswich 24 October 1691."26 
was an immigrant from England aboard the Ship "James" in July, 1636, giving his age as 23 years old. He settled at Lynn, Massachusetts and followed his trade as a Blacksmith. He was admitted a freeman September 7, 1639 and was one of the proprietors of the town. He removed to Rowley and was living there in 1641 when he had a suit of law at Ipswitch. he was also a proprietor of Rowley.

The general court, May 26, 1647 ordered him to answer at the Essex court for "neglect to further public service by delaying to shoe Mr. Symond's horse when he was about to come to the General Court". That was before the days of labor unions and strikes in America. he deposed in 1658 that he was aged about 48 years of age. he removed to Ipswitch and was a subscriber to the Denison fundin 1648. he was a commoner of Ipswitch as early 1664 and a voter in 1679.

He administered on the estate of of his wife's third son, John Littlehale, Nov. 25, 1675. He removed finally to Topsfield, where he died Jan 13, 1684. His will is dated Jan 6, 1694 and proved Mar 31, 1695. The inventory amounted to 235 pounds.27
 
Read these excerpts of stories about Edmund and, especially, his son Edmund Jr., from Leonard Dahle Hadden Family Tree.28 
ChartsAncestors of Nelle Belle Bridges

Citations

  1. [S160] Sidney Pearley, History of Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts (Boxford, MA: by the author, 1880), p. 70 "Edmund Bridges was living here in 1673" referring to Boxford. Hereinafter cited as History of Boxford.
  2. [S161] George Thomas Little, editor, Genealogical and Family History of the State of Maine (New York: Lewis Historical Publishing, 1909), four volumes, vol. 3, p. 1602: "He deposed in 1658 that he was aged about forty-six years."
  3. [S602] George Francis Dow, compiler, Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County Massachusetts (Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, 1911–1919), II:117 "Edmond Bridges, aged about forty-six years, deposed."
  4. [S168] Olive Tree Genealogy, online OliveTreeGenealogy.com, The James, June 1635
    19 June 1635. Abord the James, Jo: May for N. England.

    Tho: Ewer 40 Taylor
    Sara Ewer 28
    Elizabeth Ewer 4
    Tho: Ewer !yr. 6mo.
    Sara Beale 28
    Elizabeth Newman 24
    Jo: Skudder 16

    13 July, 1635
    Theis under written names are to be transported to N. England imbarqued in the James, Jno. May Mr for N: Er p'r Cert: from the minister of their conformity in Religion and that they are no Subsedy men.

    Wm Ballard 32 Husb.
    Elizabeth Ballard 26
    Hester Ballard 2
    Jo: Ballard 1
    Alice Jones 26
    Elizabeth Goffe 26
    Edmond Bridges 23
    Michell Milner 23
    Tho: Terry 28
    Robert Terry 25
    Rich: Terry 17
    Tho: Marshall 22
    Wm Hooper 18
    Edmond Johnson 23
    Samvel Bennet 24
    Rich: Palmer 29
    Anto. Bessy 26
    Edw: Gardner 25
    Wm colbron 16
    Henry Bull 25
    Salomon Martin 16
    Wm Hill 70 Wheels write
    Nico. Buttry 33
    Marth Buttry 28
    Grace Bu 1
    Jo: Hart 40 Shoemaker
    Mary Hart 31
    Henry Tybbott 39 Shoemaker
    Elizabeth Tybbott 39
    Jeremy Tybbott 4
    Samvell Tybbott 2
    Remembrance Tybbott 28
    Nic. Goodhue 60 Clothmaker
    Jane Goodhue 58
    John Johnson 26
    Suzan Johnson 24
    Eliza Johnson 2
    Tho: Johnson 18mo
    Ralph Farman 32 Barber
    Alice Farman 28
    Mary Farman 7
    Tho: Farman 4
    Ralph Farman 2.
  5. [S161] George Thomas Little, Genealogical and Family History of the State of Maine, p. 1601.
  6. [S1066] Sidney Perley, "Shoemaking", The Essex Antiquarian V (Apr. 1901): 55, "Lynn has been noted for its shoes since its early days, no other town in the county showing so many men of this trade, according to the county records. The earliest shoemakers there were Philip Kertland and Edmund Bridges, who came as early as 1635. In 1767 eighty thousand pairs of shoes were made there, and in 1770 Lynn-made shoes were advertised in London."
  7. [S161] George Thomas Little, Genealogical and Family History of the State of Maine, p. 1602, no surname, 1st wife.
  8. [S166] Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England (Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995-2011), I:389-90, entry for Edmund Bridges: "Some secondary sources, including Savage, propose an earlier wife Alice, but no supporting evidence for this has been found, so we assume here two wives only for Edmund Bridges."
  9. [S163] All in the Past.net, online allinthepast.net, citation for year of marriage and surname.
  10. [S161] George Thomas Little, Genealogical and Family History of the State of Maine, vol. 3, p. 1601ff.
  11. [S799] The Essex Institute, compiler, Essex Institute (Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute et al), XX:147, "Early Settlers of Rowley, Mass., Including All Who Were Here Before 1662" by Geo. B. Blodgette: "Edmund Bridges, "blacksmith," had an acre and a half house- lot, bounded on the north side by the cross street, the east end by the high street, 1643. His wife was Alice."
    "He sold his dwelling house, blacksmith's shop, and rights to Isaac Cousins 25 , and moved to Ipswich where he was in 1644. He was about 46 years old 1658 (Court Rec).
    "Child born here : 13-1 Mehitable 2, b. 26-lmo., 1640."
  12. [S794] The Essex Institute, compiler, Vital Records of Rowley Massachusetts to the End of the Year 1849, two volumes (Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, 1928), p. 32, Mahetabell, dau. of Edmund and Alice, 26 : 1m [March] : 1641.
  13. [S161] George Thomas Little, Genealogical and Family History of the State of Maine, p. 1602, no surname, 2nd wife.
  14. [S163] All in the Past, online allinthepast.net, citation for date of marriage.
  15. [S799] The Essex Institute, Historical Collections of the Essex Institute, XX:147, "Early Settlers of Rowley, Mass., Including All Who Were Here Before 1662" by Geo. B. Blodgette: "Edmund Bridges, "blacksmith," had an acre and a half house- lot, bounded on the north side by the cross street, the east end by the high street, 1643. His wife was Alice."
    "He sold his dwelling house, blacksmith's shop, and rights to Isaac Cousins 25 , and moved to Ipswich where he was in 1644. He was about 46 years old 1658 (Court Rec).
    "Child born here : 13-1 Mehitable 2, b. 26-lmo., 1640."
    Note: unsure if he was marr. or to whom at time of removal.
  16. [S161] George Thomas Little, Genealogical and Family History of the State of Maine, p. 1602; note: a fund for the pay of Major Denison, to whom had been entrusted the defence of the township against the assaults of Indians and other enemies.
  17. [S161] George Thomas Little, Genealogical and Family History of the State of Maine, p. 1602; "she was the widow of Richard Littlehale."
  18. [S173] Massachusetts Marriages, 1633-1850, Index, online Ancestry.com, Edmond Bridges marr. Mary Littlehale, 6 Apr 1665, Ipswich, Essex Co. Source: FHL, Salt Lake City, UT, Film # 0777636.
  19. [S602] George Francis Dow, Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, V:264, Salem Quarterly Court Nov 1673: "Execution, dated 9 : 7 : 1673, against Edmund Bridges, sr., and Edmund Bridges, jr. to satisfy judgment granted Adam Westgate or his attorney, at Salem Court, 24 : 4 : 1673, to be paid in beef, pork, wheat, malt and Indian corn; signed by Hilliard Veren, for the court; and served by Henry Skerry, marshal of Salem."
  20. [S166] Robert Charles Anderson, Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, I:390.
  21. [S791] Edmund Bridges will (1685), Probate record of Edmund Bridges, 1685, Ipswich, Essex Co., Mass., Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Archives, Boston, Massachusetts, online AmericanAncestors.org: Case no. 3298, 9 images. Essex County, MA: Probate File Papers, 1638-1840. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2013. (From records supplied by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Archives.). Transcript by Vincent Hartnett:
    The Last Will and Testament of Edmond Bridges Senr Black Smith
    of Ipswich in the County of Essex in New England is as folloeth,

    I Edmond Bridges being of perfect memorie and good understanding, yet by
    Reason of my weakeness of bodie and manie infermities often prevailing
    upon me, doo desire to com~end my soule in to the hands of my Blessed
    Redeemer Jesus Christ, in hope a happy Resurection,
    My will therefore is that my bodie be most decently burried after my
    discease, and all my debts be discharged, my estate be disposed of as
    followeth First I have alreadie given to my all my Children but Mary fair
    portions as was [crossed out] sutaable and convenient into my estate to _____
    of, but as an adition I give unto John Bridges my Rapier unto Josiah
    Bridges I give my Musquit unto Fayth Bridges I give a pewter platter
    marked with E B A, unto Bothiah Bridges the fellow or other pewtter
    plates with the same markes, which things my will is, that they be
    delivered unto the parties before mentioned Att my house upon there
    demand, imediately after my discease.

    Unto my Daughter Mary I give twentie pounds, that is to say a Cow shee
    calls her owne, a fether bed and what beding can conveniently be spared
    with it, And the rest to be made up in such household stuffe as my
    wife shall soo cause to supply her with.

    And my will further is that my beloved wife Mary Bridges shall have
    the res of the whole of my estate undispossed of During the time of
    her life if she remains a widdow, But if shee should marry after
    my discease she shall then have ten pounds payed unto her.

    I Doe allso will, that if my afforesaid wife Mary Bridges should
    marry, or otherwayes at the time of her Discease, that all the
    Remainder of my Estate then left shall be Equallie divided between
    John Bridges my sonne, my sonne Josiah Bridges, my Daughter Fayth
    Bridges Alias Black Bethiah Bridges Alias Peabodie and Mary Bridges
    And I doe hereby Constitute and ordaine my Beloved wife Mary Bridges
    and my sonne John Bridges to be my Executors, in order unto the
    performance of this my last will and testament And I doe desire
    Captn Daniel Epps with Leiftenant John Appleton to be the overseers for
    the fulfilling of this my will, whereunto I have sett my hand and
    seale this 6th of January 1684.

    Signed sealed and delivered [signature and seal of Edmund Bridges]
    in the presence of us
    Daniel Epps
    Edmund ____               The _____________
                        between ye 8th & 9th line
                        from ye top viz, but Mary,
                        was entered before ye
                        perfecting hereof
    Will proved at Court of Ipswich March 30: 85, Proved
    by the Executor to be the last Will & Testament of Edmon Bridges
    by the oath of Mary Bridges, Relect, & John Bridges sone to
    Ed. Bridges to the Best of the there knowledge that he was of a disposing mind
    at the same time.                    Attor. John Appleton ____.
  22. [S166] Robert Charles Anderson, Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, I:390, exhibit.
  23. [S161] George Thomas Little, Genealogical and Family History of the State of Maine, p. 1602.
  24. [S349] The Essex Institute, compiler, Vital Records of Ipswich, Massachusetts, to the end of the year 1849 (Three Volumes) (Salem, MA: Newcomb & Gauss, 1910), vol. II, p. 496: "Bridges, Edmond [sic], sr., Jan 13, 1684 [OS].
  25. [S791] Probate Records of Edmund Bridges, 1685: Case no. 3298, 9 images. Essex County, MA: Probate File Papers, 1638-1840. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2013. (From records supplied by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Archives.). Transcript by Vincent Hartnett:
    An Inventory of the State of Edmond Bridges Black Smith in Ipswich Deceased, taken ye 16th day of January 1684 £ s d
    Imp. Tools belonging to the shoppe, an Anvill at 4s------04---00---00
    It. A pair of Bellowes[...]5 payres of tongs[...]---------06---13---00
    [---]
    It. Beef & porke[...]5 cowes[...]3 swine-----------------27---09---00
    [---]
    It. The homestead[...]70 acres of Land-----------------90---00---00
    [...]

    The total value was set at £215 06s 06d, less debts of £7 14s 11d.
  26. [S166] Robert Charles Anderson, Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, see memo for suggestion that there was no wife "Alice", and that all EB's children were of Elizabeth, save Mary, of Mary Littlehale.
  27. [S169] John Frye Family - Andover MA Family Tree, chicoan, owner, online Ancestry.com. Hereinafter cited as John Fry Family Family Tree.
  28. [S171] JoAnnHadden67, compiler, "Leonard Dahle Hadden Family Tree";
    Edmund's father, also Edmund, was living in Topsfield in 1660. He came to Massachusetts in 1635 and is said to have lived in Lynn, Rowley, and Ipswich, to which he returned some years before his death. The name Edmund Bridges appears frequently in the Essex County Court Records, and it is not possible always to distinguish father from son. They both acted as witnesses as juryman and as attorneys....Edmund Bridges, Jr., was evidently considered familiar with legal procedure and skilled in the trade. He along with John and Nathaniel Putnam, with whom we will shortly become familiar, all appear over and over again as witnesses and attorneys in the county court records. This did not necessarily mean that they were notoriously litigious, but that they were asked to represent others in court." (Currents of Malice - Persis W. McMillen)

    1661: Commoner of Topsfield. Settled near father in law Towne. (History of Topsfield)

    1664: Paid minister's rate at Topsfield. (History of Topsfield)

    "Sarah's husband was a very busy man, for in addition to his legal activities, he had still another trade. He was a blacksmith... His blacksmith shop was a center of town activity, as was neighboring John Gould's 'ordinary'." (Currents of Malice - Persis W. McMillen)

    "The Essex County Court records are full of a bewildering number of references to Edmund Bridges in connection with John Gould...In March, 1664, an individual called John Millington was sentenced to be whipped, or to pay a fine of ten pounds, "for his great misdemeanor" and also to be bound for twenty pounds. A person, whose name is deliberately left out, deposed that in January her brother, Edmund Bridges, asked her to go to Salem with him, but she did not go and Edmund and his wife left without her. Whilst they were gone, John Millington offered "uncleaness to her, and she told him that she would not yield to him for all of Topsfield". Although Millington later prayed that she, the one to whom he had offered "uncleaness" would forgive him, Sarah Bridges acted as a witness in the resulting court case. She referred to her sister. It is not at all clear who this sister was...The reference may have been to Faith, one of Edmund Bridge's sisters. Faith and her husband Daniel Black, were involved in domestic troubles, and at one point had been ordered to sit in the stocks for an hour. Danile was ordered to live peaceably with his wife, and to refrain from threatening her, while she, for her part, was to be orderly, not gad abroad or be in the company of other men. If either party disobeyed these rules, they were to be whipped." (Currents of Malice - Persis W. McMillen)

    "Edmund Bridges appears far more often in connection with John Gould in a bewildering series of cases connected with the ill-starred iron works. Iron works were established in Rowley Village (now Boxford) around 1668. They were sited not far from the Topsfield line upon some land left to Gould by his father Zaccheus...Although Edmund was not personally involved in the manufacture of iron, as a blacksmith he was deeply interested. It is a fact that the records show that Edmund was in debt to John Gould even before the establishment of the iron works. Court records are full of suits between the two men in which payments were ordered to be in bar iron. By November 1670, Bridges was in serious trouble and was sued for 'not setting his hand to a bill of sale'. He was ordered to sign over the deed of his house and land in Topsfield, or to pay one hundred and fifty pounds to Gould. Since he did not have the money, he went to prison, losing eight acres of land, a dwelling house and a barn at the same time. However, Edmund, although down, was not out. He apparently realized enough from the sale of his property, and from the collection of other debts outstanding, to be able to buy a small piece of land near the waterfront in Salem. Here he built another house and a barn." The family moved there. (Currents of Malice - Persis W. McMillen)

    1668: Sold house and 8 acres of land to Ensign John Gould, bounded on ne by land of Thomas Perkins Sr., e and w e by that of Jacob Towne, w and s by John Robinson and Edmund Towne. Deed not given until 1670 when Edmund Bridges had moved to that part of Salem, now Danvers, not far from the Topsfield line. His house there is said to have stood on the se side of Rea's hill, so called. The building was later purchased by John A. Sears, father of Judge George B. Sears, and moved to his farm in Putnamville. (History of Topsfield)

    November 1670; John Robinson bought a house and eighteen acres of land from John Gould for 40 pounds which had formerly belonged to Edmund Bridges (jr or sr?). (History of Topsfield)

    "Edmund Bridges and a certain William Becket owned part of a wharf on the Salem waterfront. Edmund also procured a license to sell alcholic beverages." "Sarah became involved with running the waterfront tavern while her husband carried on with his legal practice, often appearing in Salem quarterly courts as attorney, arbitrator and as a witness." (Currents of Malice - Persis W. McMillen)

    1673: Petition got up by Robert Smith, John Ramsdell and he protesting reassignment of certain families from Topsfield to Rowley for tax purposes. (The Refiners Fire; Mormon Cosmology)

    1678: "Edmund Bridges was involved in 1678 in a court case with a powerful Salem merchant, Mr. Edmund Batter... The character of Edmund Batter is described by Bernard Bailyn as "extraordinary in it's brutality..." Edmund Bridges sued Batter for defamation of character for : "saying that (the said Bridges) was the leader of a factious company in Salem and that it was their design to overthrow all order and government in the town of Salem, and also for saying that the plaintiff was the caus of all trouble in Salem." Bridges relations and some others came to his defense. Francis Nurse, a brother in law, and Isaac Cooke, deposed that in a public town meeting in the past spring, they had heard Batter make these charges. Jacob Towne, another brother in law, and John Hobb, testified that fifteen years earlier when Bridges had been a resident and voter in Topsfield, he had opposed those who did not have the right to vote by law. In other words, that Bridges was on the side of law and order. They also said that he had taken the required oath of fidelity twelve years earlier. Thomas Preston, a son in law of Rebecca and Francis Nurse and therefore another relative of Bridges, testified that he had heard Batter say that Edmund Bridges was the ringleader of the opposing company. He further deposed that, as he was generally at town meetings, he had never heard Bridges speak before he asked leave of the moderator. Bridges had told Preston that he wished to prevent disorder at the meetings." The opposing side was a powerful group of elites, and the judges as well. The court ruled against Bridges and imposed a fine of two pounds, five shillings and eighpence to be paid to Batter." (Currents of Malice - Persis W. McMillen)

    May 1679: Selectman consented that Edmund Bridges could sit the seat in the gallery of the meeting house vacated by Sargeant Lake. Sarah could sit in the next seat behind the woman's pew, but of course, as female, was not allowed to speak. (Currents of Malice - Persis W. McMillen)

    September 12, 1682: "the widow of Edmund Bridges and her children were ordered out of Topsfield by the constable, September 12, 1682. She was Sarah Town, daughter of William, and had probably returned to Topsfield after the death of her husband which had occured a few months earlier. She soon became the second wife of Peter Cloyse and was accused of witchcraft but was not executed." (History of Topsfield)

    November 28, 1682: Inventory of estate by Francis Nurse, John How. (History of Framingham), online Ancestry.com.
  29. [S161] George Thomas Little, Genealogical and Family History of the State of Maine, p. 1602; name Hachaliah.
  30. [S163] All in the Past, online allinthepast.net, gives birth year as 1639 to 1644.
  31. [S161] George Thomas Little, Genealogical and Family History of the State of Maine, p. 1602; see also Yankee Doodle Tree: "7. Faith, married Daniel Black, who settled at York, Maine. " quoted from Great Migrations.
  32. [S163] All in the Past, online allinthepast.net, gives birth year.
  33. [S161] George Thomas Little, Genealogical and Family History of the State of Maine, p. 1602; estimated birth date from marr in 1663.
  34. [S167] Yankee Doodle Tree, yankeedoodlemark, owner, online Ancestry.com, refers to The Great Migration for birth date.