Sir John Colepeper1

#2951, (circa 1420 - 22 December 1480)
Relationship14th great-grandfather of William David Lewis
Father*Walter Colepeper2 (c 1398 - 1462)
Mother*Agnes Roper2 (b 1410 - )
Sir John Colepeper was also known as John Culpepper modern spelling. 
Birth*circa 1420He was born circa 1420.3 
Marriage*before 1460He married Agnes Gainsford, daughter of John Gainsford IV and Anne Wakehurst, before 1460; her second.4 
Death*22 December 1480He died on 22 December 1480 at EnglandB.5 
Burial*1480He was buried in 1480 at St. Mary's Church, Bedgbury Chapel, Goudhurst, Kent, EnglandB; est. date.6,7 
ChartsAncestors of William D. Lewis

Citations

  1. [S301] Adrian Benjamin Burke, John Blythe Dobson and Janet Chevalley Wolfe, "The Exhurst Ancestry of the Stoughton Siblings of New England", The New England Historical and Genealogical Register 165,166 (Oct. 2011, Jan. 2012): Vol. 166, p. 57, footnote 104: "A history of the Culpepper family is provided in F.W.T. Attree and J.H.L. Booker, “The Sussex Colepepers, Part I and II,” Sussex Archaeological Collections, 47 (1904):47–81 and 48 (1905):65–98. The pedigree of “Colepeper of Bedgebury” (48:72–73) shows Walter Roberts of Cranbrook married to Isabel, daughter of Sir John Culpepper of Bedgebury and his wife Agnes, sister of John Gainsford. The identification of Isabel’s father as Sir John Culpeper is consistent with the Roberts pedigrees in both Kent visitations (Hovenden [note 6], 93, and Bannerman [note 12], 2:24) and in the Roberts (p. 68) and Culpepper (p. 2) pedigrees in the Sussex visitation [note 17]. Other Culpepper pedigrees in these visitations omit Isabel."
  2. [S301] Adrian Benjamin Burke, John Blythe Dobson and Janet Chevalley Wolfe, "The Exhurst Ancestry of the Stoughton Siblings", Vol. 166, pp. 67-70.
  3. [S335] Culpepper Connections, online gen.culpepper.com.
  4. [S301] Adrian Benjamin Burke, John Blythe Dobson and Janet Chevalley Wolfe, "The Exhurst Ancestry of the Stoughton Siblings", Vol. 166, p. 57, and see footnote 104: "A history of the Culpepper family is provided in F.W.T. Attree and J.H.L. Booker, “The Sussex Colepepers, Part I and II,” Sussex Archaeological Collections, 47 (1904):47–81 and 48 (1905):65–98. The pedigree of “Colepeper of Bedgebury” (48:72–73) shows Walter Roberts of Cranbrook married to Isabel, daughter of Sir John Culpepper of Bedgebury and his wife Agnes, sister of John Gainsford. The identification of Isabel’s father as Sir John Culpeper is consistent with the Roberts pedigrees in both Kent visitations (Hovenden [note 6], 93, and Bannerman [note 12], 2:24) and in the Roberts (p. 68) and Culpepper (p. 2) pedigrees in the Sussex visitation [note 17]. Other Culpepper pedigrees in these visitations omit Isabel."
  5. [S333] Col. F. W. T. Attree and Rev. J. H. L. Booker, "The Sussex Colepepers", Sussex Archaeological Collections, vol. 47 and 48 (1904 and 1905): vol. 47, p. 59.
  6. [S335] Culpepper Connections, online gen.culpepper.com, "John Bedgebury was the last of his line, and when his widow Agnes married Walter Culpeper7 (1398-1462, a direct ancestor of the modern-day Culpeppers), the ancient manor of Bedgebury went with her. Walter and Agnes were commemorated by a brass in the church, but all that is left of this are the three shields on the slab next to the Bedgebury brass. (The man in armor belongs to a later period and there is no record of his identity). The remains of their son, Sir John Culpeper8 (1428-1480, also a direct ancestor) lie with those of his wife, formerly Agnes Gainsford, in the arched tomb beside the altar in the chapel. There may have been a contemporary altar attached to the south side of this tomb. Part of a double canopy remains."
  7. [S336] Goudhurst, Kent. A Wealden hill village, online \http://www.goudhurst.co.uk/index.html\, "The earliest record of St Mary's Church, Goudhurst, is dated 1119 in the reign of Henry 1. There was probably a church on the hill above the village long before then, perhaps even in Saxon times. From the present tower it is said that you can see (on a clear day, and presumably with a telescope!) an many as fifty-one other churches, from Lympne by the marshes to Ide Hill on the North Downs. Formerly this prospect would have been ever more remarkable, for when the tower was built in the early part of the 14th century it was one storey higher and crowned with a spire. The spire stood until 1637 when, during a summer storm it was struck by lightning and burned to destruction. To the North-West, Canary Wharf Tower in London can now be seen, a distance of forty miles.

    The earliest church would have been a simple structure, probably on the line of the present south aisle. For hundreds of years the approach was from the south rather than the west as now, for until 1768 there was no road through the village on the line of the present High Street. The narrow Iane on the south side of the church, called Back Lane, was then the only highway.
    Though the south door (still used occasionally) has a rounded arch, it is not Norman but middle 14th century. Stonework within the church survives from all periods after the 12th century. Traces of 13th century lancet windows can be seen in the walls of the Sanctuary. The colonnade dates from the early 13th century and is of limestone from Caen in Normandy. The exterior is built of Kentish ragstone.

    Chief of the church's treasures is the rare monument in painted wood to Sir Alexander Culpeper and his wife. A fine memorial to other members of the Culpeper family is to be seen in the Bedgebury Chapel. Of three ancient brasses in the chapel, the oldest dates from 1424 and commemorates John Bedgebury who went to Agincourt to fight with his king, Henry V.

    Before the Reformation a rood screen and loft spanned the east end of the nave and side aisles. It was removed some time about 1560. Parts of it were used to make the screens of the two side chapels. A door in the north aisle led to the rood-loft turret.

    During the Battle of Britain in 1940 two parachute mines destroyed most of the glass in the church. A small panel of 15th century glass survives in the west window of the south aisle. The Te Deum window at the east end is a modern design replacing a memorial window that was destroyed.". Hereinafter cited as goudhurst.co.uk.
  8. [S340] Charles W. Martin, History and Description of Leeds Castle, Kent (Westminster: Nichols and Son, 1869).